Tag Archives: Physiotherapy

Hamstrings and the Nordboard

Hamstring injuries are among the most common injuries sustained in sports. They are prevalent in all sports that include running and kicking, such as AFL, soccer rugby codes and track and field.

The average amount of time an AFL player misses if they injure their hamstring, is about 3 weeks. Whilst that isn’t a large amount of time, one of the main issues is that hamstring injuries are prone to recurrence. What can start as a short-term injury can ruin an athletes season if they have recurrent problems.

This is where the Nordboard can help. The Nordboard is a device that has been developed to accurately measure the strength of your hamstring muscles. One of the reasons why hamstring injuries can occur and indeed why they can reoccur is because of a lack of strength in the muscle group. We are lucky enough to have a Nordboard here at the clinic at QSMC.

The team at Vald Performance developed the Nordboard with a large amount of research and now have some strong evidence that if the strength of your hamstring muscles are below a certain level for particular sports you increase your risk of injury, or if there is a difference in strength between each of the hamstrings. This makes the Nordboard a very powerful tool to evaluate your strength, help make the decision if you need to do more strength work and help determined if you are ready to return to training after an injury. That’s the reason why so many of the professional sports teams such as our friends at the Brisbane Lions now utilise the device to screen their players and to monitor their progress following an injury. It will also be one of the reasons that the recurrence rate of hamstring injuries has started to decrease in recent years.

If you have had a hamstring injury or are part of a sporting team then getting QSMC to accurately assess your strength on the Nordboard can help to minimise the effect your hamstring injury has on your chosen sport.

Contact our friendly reception team on (07) 3891 2000 to book in for a hamstring test on the Nordboard today. To watch a video of the Nordboard in action. Click here. 

 

 

Ankle Injuries – 14 Day Balance Challenge

What to do about that ‘dodgy’ ankle?

Try this quick test without shoes on – stand on one foot and close your eyes.
Have a friend time how long you can keep your balance.
If you can’t stay balanced for at least 30 seconds you need to read on.

Ankle Sprains – The Facts!

Ankle sprains are the most common team sport injury and account for up to 60-90% of all injuries. Unfortunately after the first time sprained, and without any rehabilitation, you have around a 70% chance of rolling the same ankle again.
Balance is very important to ankle stability. Balance is made up by a combination of three different senses:

  1. Vision
  2. Vestibular (Ears)
  3. Joints

Unfortunately, once we sprain our ankle the message of ‘Position’ to our brain gets a little confused and in effect makes our balance worse. The good news is balance can be improved with practice. This can then decrease your chances of re-injuring the ankle again.

Give this 14-day balance challenge a go to improve balance and prevent re-injuring the ankle.

14-Day Balance Challenge

Exercises should be completed twice daily and should take approximately 10mins with no footwear or tape.

Day 1 – 3
1) Single leg balance, eyes open, standing on the floor – 30secs x 10reps
2) Single leg balance, eyes closed, standing on the floor – 30secs x 10reps

Day 4 – 6
**Note – unstable surface = either a pillow, foam mat/mattress, mini-tramp or a wobbleboard/durodisc at your gym
1) Single leg balance on unstable surface eyes open – 30secs x 10reps
2) Line walking – heel toe walking over 10 metres – 10m x 5reps
3) Standing on injured leg, kicks whilst maintaining balance – 4 x 10 kicks forward, backward & sideways whilst maintaining balance

Day 7 – 9
1) Single leg balance on unstable surface eyes closed – 30secs x 10reps
2) Forward hop-soft landing, hold landing 3secs – 2 x 10reps

Day 10 – 12
1) Single leg 1/4 squat on unstable surface, eyes open – 4 x 10reps
2) Sideways hop on ground, hold landing 3secs – 2 x 10 each way
3) Forward hop off step, land softly, hold landing 3secs – 2 x 10reps

Day 13 – 14
1) Single leg 1/4 squat on foam, eyes closed – 4 x 10reps
2) single leg hop with 1/4 turn on ground – 2 x 10 clockwise & anticlockwise
3) Sideway hop off step, land softly, hold landing 3secs – 2 x 10reps to each side

Final tip to a quicker recovery – Sport specific retraining is the key!

To make an appointment with one of our Physiotherapy team to discuss your ankle injury, sports specific retraining and when to return to sport book online, email reception@qsmc.net.au or call 07 3891 2000.

The ‘Need-to-Know’ on Knee Injuries

The ‘Need-to-Know’ on Knee Injuries.  What injuries cause the most prolonged absence from sport and how to know when to return?

The knee joint is formed by the thigh bone (femur) and shin bone (tibia). Your kneecap, or patella, sits in a groove on your femur and this joint is know as you patellofemoral joint. The main movements that your knee performs is bending (knee flexion) or straightening (extension). There are four main ligaments that help restrict unwanted movements at your knee: the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, the medial ligament which is on the inside, and lateral ligament which is on the outside.

The major structure that when injured causes the most prolonged absence from sport is the ACL, which stops the tibia moving forward on the femur as well as rotation. Commonly it is injured when pivoting or landing and it is accompanied by a loud ‘pop.’ Typically you are unable to continue the activity due to the knee giving way and pain. This is usually followed by swelling. If the ACL has ruptured, you will more than likely require a knee reconstruction. Diagnosis of such an injury is able to be made by your physiotherapist but may also require an orthopaedic surgeon to assess the knee and possibly investigations such as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to confirm the diagnosis and to assess for other coexisting pathologies..

The most common type of reconstruction performed uses your hamstring tendon as the graft for the new ligament. The surgeon may elect to use another method such as your patella tendon, or even a synthetic graft.  In the reconstruction, the surgeon will take a portion of your hamstring tendon and insert it to take the place of your ACL. This is all done by arthroscope and physiotherapy will generally start within the first week. Over the course of the next nine to twelve months, a rehabilitation program will be followed which is set out by the orthopaedic surgeon in consultation with your physiotherapist. After such surgery and a comprehensive rehab program, you can reduce the risk of injury to almost the same risk of injury as you had before your initial injury.

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But at the end of your rehabilitation, how do you know when you right to return to sport? Below are a series of hop tests which can help you and your physiotherapist decide when you are right to return.

Studies have shown that 3 simple tests: vertical jump, hop for distance and a side hop can accurately show when your knee is right for action. Your injured side must be at least 90% of your un-injured leg in all tests to pass. The tests look at the strength of the muscles surrounding your knee, the ability to control your knee under high load as well as its resistance to fatigue. It is important that these tests are done under appropriate supervision of your physiotherapist.

Vertical Jump
Start by standing upright on your un-injured leg with your arm up as high as possible with chalk bend your knee and jump as high as possible while striking the wall with your hand at the highest point. Repeat with your injured side.

Hop for Distance
Stand on your uninjured leg with hands behind your back, bend your knee and hop as far as possible. You must be able to hold the landing for 3 seconds. Measure from your toe at push off and the heel where you landed. Repeat with your injured leg and compare the two scores.

Side Hop
Get two strips of tape 40cm apart on the floor. Stand on your un-injured leg and hop from side to side without touching the tape as many times as you can in 30 seconds. Repeat the test with your injured side and compare the two results.

The results of these tests will let you know what elements you need to work on: strength, stability or fatigue. These tests should be completed under appropriate supervision and it is also important that if you have had a reconstruction, before you return to sport, you are cleared by your orthopaedic surgeon.

To make an appointment with one of our Physiotherapy team to discuss your keen pain or when to return to sport book online, email reception@qsmc.net.au or call 07 3891 2000.

Out of the Lions den and into the Centre

Over the last 12 years one of QSMC’s Directors and Sports Physiotherapist Shane Lemcke has been at the Centre in a reduced capacity to enable him to work full-time with the Brisbane Lions. Particularly in the last 7 years as Medical Coordinator, Shane has had the opportunity to work with players and other practitioners on a multi-disciplinary approach to treatment of players at an elite level. At the end of the season Shane decided it was time to move on from the Lions to allow him more time to devote to his young family and share his experience with the staff here at QSMC. We are very excited to be getting his experience back on the treatment floor full-time as of November.

Shane is looking forward to getting back to the Centre to work with our exciting range of practitioners and reconnect with his clients. Shane will also have capacity to take on new clients and with his experience in working with athletes in a pressured environment to minimise the impact of injury.

We asked Shane to give some insight into working with the football team and how it differs from the QSMC treatment floor.

Firstly, welcome back! What made you decide to move on from the Brisbane Lions?
After 12 years working with the club I decided that it was time to step away from football and head back to the Centre. I have a young family now and it’s important that I devote some time to them, which is difficult to do when travelling with a football team. It was time for a change and I’m really looking forward to getting back to the Centre environment.

What is the best thing about working with a football team such as the Brisbane Lions?
For me it’s about the relationships that have been built over a long period of time. Even though we didn’t always achieve the win, it doesn’t take away from being part of a team and working together for a common goal. Watching players develop and improve is really exciting to be able to contribute to their growth and development as an individual and an athlete is extremely fulfilling.

What are the main differences when treating athletes?
You get to have access to them, essentially full-time. The treatment that you are providing to them can be as often as required and the approach is a collaborative multi-disciplinary treatment plan to get the best outcome for the player. You find yourself working with a strong team of experts daily, coordinating treatment in the gym and taking them right through to running onto the field for a game.

What do you feel you have gained as a Sports Physiotherapist?
Definitely the experience of managing injury. For an athlete you want to minimise the impact that injury has on their ability to play and maximise the outcome to get them back to playing as quickly and safely as possible. It’s a pressured environment and makes you a better practitioner for it. I’m looking forward to working with clients and developing strong injury management plans from my experience with the Lions to get them back to their sport or activity of choice.

Lastly, what are you most looking forward to coming back to at QSMC?
I think at QSMC we have such an exciting range of practitioners which such vast experience. I have been at the Centre in a somewhat part-time capacity for the last few years, focusing more on the management side of things and have seen the Centre go from strength to strength within our team. I’m looking forward to getting back to the floor full-time and working with all of that great experience as well as getting to contribute. Mostly I’m looking forward to reconnecting with previous clients and building relationships with new clients to work on the most effective treatment plan for them.

Everyone at QSMC is really looking forward to having Shane back full-time and treating as of November. If you are looking for a high quality injury management plan, book an appointment with Shane by contacting the Centre reception on 07 3891 2000.

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